Educational Articles

Cats + Pet Services

  • Arsenic poisoning is the accidental ingestion, skin contact, or inhalation of products containing a toxic dose of arsenic. The clinical signs of sudden arsenic poisoning can vary depending on the dose. Supportive therapy is a crucial part of treating arsenic poisoning. Aggressive fluid therapy and rehydration is necessary and helps the body to remove arsenic from the body.

  • There are many environmentally friendly ways that owners can care for their pets. Waste disposal can involve biodegradable or compostable bags or careful composting. Cat litter can be transitioned to recycled newspaper or sawdust pellets. Any toys, beds, houses and other accessories can be biodegradable and/or recycled such as cotton or rubber. Cats should be kept indoors to reduce their impact on the ecology of their surrounding environment. A nutritionally adequate diet composed of organic food can be provided.

  • Acetaminophen (Tylenol®, Paracetamol, APAP, N-acetyl-p-aminophenol) is a pain relief and fever-reducing medicine people use for many types of pain. Acetaminophen is available in many forms including tablets, capsules, gel caps, melt away tablets, rectal suppositories, and liquids. Acetaminophen is often found in homes with pets. Poisoning may happen when pets get into the owner’s medications.

  • Acetaminophen is a medication that is used to treat fever and/or pain in humans. Cats have a genetic deficiency in a metabolic pathway in the liver that makes cats vulnerable to acetaminophen toxicity.

  • Acute kidney injury (AKI) refers to the sudden failure of the kidneys to perform normal filtration duties (previously referred to as acute renal failure). The clinical signs, potential causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of this condition are outlined in this handout.

  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome, also known as shock lung, is a life-threatening complication of critical illness in cats, such as systemic infection or disease, severe trauma, or near-drowning. Treatment involves targeting the underlying cause while also supporting the cat's compromised lung function with the use of an oxygen cage, an oxygen line direct to the cat's nasal passages, or in severe cases, a mechanical ventilator. Unfortunately, the prognosis for this condition is poor.

  • Addison’s disease, also known as hypoadrenocorticism, is a condition in which the adrenal glands do not produce enough glucocorticoids (steroids) and is considered rare in cats. When normal adrenal gland tissue is destroyed, cats often have a history of waxing and waning periods of lethargy, decreased appetite, and weight loss.

  • Lipomas are common, usually harmless, tumors of fat that usually show up as a lump under the skin in middle-aged to older animals. Some pets will develop these tumors in their armpit region, between their legs, or around the neck, which can cause discomfort and/or lameness. You may see your pet exhibit an irregular gait, and/or reluctance to stand, walk upstairs, or go for their normal walks. This handout reviews the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of lipomas.

  • An adrenal cortex tumor is an abnormal growth of cells in the adrenal cortex. These tumors result in overproduction of cortisol and can be malignant (cancerous) or benign. In both cases, an adrenal cortex tumor can cause Cushing's disease in dogs. Malignant tumors can metastasize to other organs, including the kidneys, lymph nodes, and thyroid gland. The sooner a diagnosis and treatment plan can be determined, the better the outcome for your pet.

  • The adrenal medulla is responsible for producing hormones such as epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine. An adrenal medulla tumor is the result of abnormal, uncontrolled growth of the cells that produce these hormones. These tumors may go undetected for a long time and clinical signs may be subtle. These signs could include weakness, excessive panting and restlessness, newly noted anxiety, and an increase in drinking and urination. The biggest concern with these tumors is their ability to continue to grow and invade local tissues, which can make surgical removal difficult or impossible.

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